Attaching superiorly at the spine (to the transverse processes and lateral surface of thoracic vertebra 12 to
the last lumbar vertebra and corresponding discs) and traversing down and forward through the pelvis to attach to the inside of the upper leg (lesser trochanter).

Tension in the psoas can limit the fetal space as the baby descends into the pelvic inlet.

 

 

 

Psoas release

Place the bolster near the bottom of the shoulder blades.  Make sure that the ribs remain relaxed and flush with your abdominal wall. Extend the legs.

Make sure that the back of your thighs fully touches the floor. If they don’t, you need to bolster up higher.  Relax here for 5-10 min.  Allow your legs and torso to relax.  Practice breathing.  Focus on allowing the pelvic floor muscles to relax on the inhale. Tension in the pelvic floor can pull on the sacrum, limiting sacral mobility that is necessary to widen the pelvic outlet.

How to release the Psoas

Hands down, one of my favourite muscles in the body is the psoas major.  Mostly because I have had personal experience in "rehabbing" my own psoas strain (took me 2 years for it to get back to "normal"), and chronic back and SI pain.

As you can see from the picture, this muscle covers some real estate:  Attaching superiorly at the spine (to the transverse processes and lateral surface of thoracic vertebra 12 to the last lumbar vertebra and corresponding discs) and traversing down and forward through the pelvis to attach to the inside of the upper leg (lesser trochanter).

Understanding and visualizing the position of this muscle should help you appreciate the relationship of the psoas to the function of the trunk/spine, pelvis, and extremities.  It is involved in everything!  As soon as I began to respect the stress and excessive loads that I was placing on my psoas (there are two, one on each side), my groin strain went away and so did my back and SI pain.

As I work with clients with back, pelvic, hip and SI pain, a psoas release is one of the first steps toward decreasing tension and moving toward healthy tissues!

(Ref. http://www.alignforhealth.com/blog/category/psoas%20release)